Antibody-drug Conjugates

Specificity Stability Potency

Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) technology

Our antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) technology combines the specificity of monoclonal antibodies, innovative linker systems, and the power of potent cell-killing agents to treat cancer. Using our proprietary industry-leading technology, we are able to optimize each ADC to potentially improve outcomes for patients.

Monoclonal Antibody
  • Unlike traditional chemotherapy which may be nonspecific, antibodies specifically target tumor-associated proteins, such as those found on the surface of tumor cellsa
  • Ideal antibodies recognize and bind tightly to the target cell, have minimal binding to healthy cells, and have prolonged systemic exposureb,c
  • At Seattle Genetics, we apply our knowledge of disease biology to screen for and engineer antibodies with ideal properties to serve as the foundation of our ADCs 

a  Ducry L et al. Bioconjug Chem. 21(1):5-13; 2010
b  Carter P et al. Am Assoc Cancer Res Educ Book. 2005(1):147-154; 2005 
c  Peters and Brown. Biosci Rep. 35(4); 2015

Linker
  • The linker chemically attaches the cell-killing (cytotoxic) agent to the antibodya
  • Ideal linkers are stable in systemic circulation but release the cytotoxic payload once inside target cells thereby limiting off-target toxicitya
  • At Seattle Genetics, we are continually developing new classes of linkers to specifically deliver the maximum cell-killing dose to the target cell, increasing antitumor activity while potentially limiting side effects for patients 

a  Diamantis and Banerji. Br J Cancer. 114(4): 362-367; 2016

Cytotoxic Payload
  • The cytotoxic agent kills the targeted tumor cell upon internalization and release from the ADCa
  • Ideal cytotoxic agents remain stable while linked to the ADC, are highly potent against the specific tumor type, maintain activity in multidrug-resistant tumor cells, and induce cell deatha
  • At Seattle Genetics, in addition to our proven cytotoxic agents, auristatins (microtubule disrupting agent) and a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer (a DNA-damaging agent), we continue to develop new cytotoxic agents that have increased potency, overcome drug resistance, and have novel mechanisms of action

a Drachman and Senter. Hematology. 2013:306-310; 2013